Skip to main content
A Magazine for
Live / stage review

Joy, nostalgia and epic brass: Bombay Bicycle Club at Leadmill

Returning to The Leadmill after three years, indie rockers Bombay Bicycle Club performed a set full of fan favourites ahead of their run of summer festivals.

21 July 2022 at
9 F55 F2 CC AA5 B 43 E9 AE8 D EE3406664427
Sahar Ghadirian

It’s no secret that The Leadmill is a special place for many people, but included in that long list of admirers is London’s finest indie rock band, Bombay Bicycle Club. The last time they played Leadmill was back in July 2019, choosing the venue to mark their return to touring after a four year hiatus. Fast-forward to 2022, and the band’s intimate return to the Steel City was full of joy, nostalgia, new music, and an epic brass section.

A lot has changed since the band were last in Sheffield, playing the Academy in February 2020. Their fifth album Everything Else Has Gone Wrong had just been released and the concept of a national lockdown was nothing but a rumour. The band kicked off their Leadmill set with the first single from that album, the endearing ‘Eat, Sleep, Wake (Nothing But You)’. It’s a song that not only reminds fans of summer 2019, but paved the way for Bombay’s return to music after five years.

Moving on to ‘Is It Real’, Jack Steadman filled the room with his gentle vocals. Swapping between instruments and their amazing brass band, Bombay stunned fans again with their cover of Selena Gomez’s ‘Lose You To Love Me’, which saw one audience member proudly sitting on their friend’s shoulders. Steadman revealed why they covered the song in 2020: while recording their fifth album they shared a studio with Gomez, who asked the band to take the song back to England.

The indie quartet closed by debuting a new track, ‘I Want To Be Your Only Pet’, which felt just as euphoric as the material on the last album, signalling promising times ahead.

by Sahar Ghadirian (she/her)

More Music

Music out of time

Rejecting a western obsession with progression, a school of radical music-makers have since the 1960s experimented with new forms of composition that sit outside of time itself.

More Music