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Rice.

by Now Then Sheffield

200g risotto rice per person (I use Arborio)
150g Jerusalem artichokes, peeled and finely sliced
2 sticks of celery, finely chopped
1 medium onion, finely chopped
1 large courgette, sliced
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 small glass white wine (about 125ml)
1 tbsp olive oil
1 litre vegetable stock (two cubes)
50g grated parmesan
Knob of butter

Gently fry the onion and celery in the oil for a few minutes until softened. Add the garlic and the rice and stir on the heat for another minute or two, until the rice becomes translucent. Add the wine and stir well. Add the artichokes and courgette and a ladle of the stock. Simmer gently, stirring almost constantly until the stock is absorbed.

Continue adding the stock a ladle at a time and stirring throughout until the risotto is creamy and the rice has lost its crunch (between 20 and 30 minutes). Once you are happy with the consistency, do not add any more stock. Quickly stir through the butter and parmesan and serve immediately.

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100g pudding rice
700ml milk
50g sugar
Nutmeg (to taste)
Jam or syrup (to serve)

Heat the oven to 150°C/Fan 130°C/Gas Mark 2. Wash the rice thoroughly and drain well. Grease a large baking dish with butter, then add the rice and sugar and stir in the milk. Grate a little nutmeg on top. Cook for two hours, stirring after 30 minutes and again after another 30 minutes, then leaving unstirred for a final hour. When it comes out it should be thick, creamy and delicious. Serve with a little drizzle of golden syrup or a blob of jam.

PHOTOS BY SARA HILL.
COOKING BY FREDDIE BATES.

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by Now Then Sheffield

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