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Queer Hedonism is Alive in the North

Gut Level launch t-shirt campaign to raise funds for the future.

Gut Level T Shirt Picture 1

In what feels like no time at all, DIY event space and music venue Gut Level has become a much-loved pocket of queer club culture in Sheffield. Its ethos of community and collaboration is manifested through providing a platform for people who are traditionally underrepresented in the music industry - so queer / LGBTQ+ people, women and non-binary folks - and nurturing a safe space which encourages skill sharing, intersectional collaboration and grassroots creative activities. Oh, and they throw turbo mega parties too.

However, their home on Snow Lane has fallen foul of property developers, a story which is all too familiar for people who set up DIY spaces in Sheffield. Posting on Instagram, GL said: “Insecure tenancies, accelerated gentrification and the appearance of luxury accommodation on every street corner has made it virtually impossible for small independent spaces to exist long-term in central locations.”

But the Gut Level organisers have refused to let the unexpected eviction get them down and are forging ahead with plans for the future. To raise funds for said future they’ve launched a t-shirt campaign in collaboration with Everpress. All funds from the campaign will go straight into Gut Level’s piggy bank so they can continue supporting the future of the organisation, and funding grassroots, queer and DIY activities in Sheffield.

With “Queer Hedonism is Alive in the North” emblazoned across the front, the t-shirt is bold and defiant. You can buy yours via Everpress until 4 August.

by Felicity Jackson (she/her)
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