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Julian Peters / John Philip Johnson

by Now Then Sheffield
We have something a bit different for you this month. Julian Peters is an illustrator based state-side who makes illustrated comics out of poems. This time he has collaborated with a contemporary poet, John Philip Johnson. It’s taken from a collection called ‘Stairs Appear in a Hole Outside of Town’, which also includes graphic adaptations of several other poems and is available in digital or paper form at johnphilipjohnson.com. Our next Word Life event is on 8 May at Theatre Deli on The Moor. It’s a double launch night, with Tom Chivers launching his new collection and a CD release from the Paper Boat poets – local heroes Charlotte Ansell, Gav Roberts, Gevi Carver and Matt McAteer. Joe [imagebrowser id=56] )
by Now Then Sheffield

Next article in issue 85

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