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Florence Blanchard Flabbergast

Sheffield-based artist and screenprinter releases stunning new artwork.

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Florence Blanchard has been a firm favourite of ours since we featured her artwork on the printed pages of Now Then way back in 2013, so it’s a real pleasure to be able to share her beautiful new screenprint, Flabbergast, with our readers.

Hey Florence. We’re a little bit in love with your new screenprint. How did it come into being?

Thank you! I’ve had this specific design in mind for a while. It’s a continuation of a printing project I started during the first lockdown. The series explores different contrasts and compositions of abstract shapes.

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What made you choose the name Flabbergast?

It’s such a flamboyant word, I love it. You really have to be in a specific situation to use it. I always read it but never said it until last year so I thought I would make an artwork about it and celebrate this moment.

I bet the screen-printing process is a real labour of love. How did it feel once they were all done and dusted?

Well yes, definitely. Because of my background in science I’ve always loved experimenting with complex technical processes. It can be daunting to make a start sometimes, knowing how much work it is going to be so I try to accept it’s going to take a long time and focus on the journey more than the end product. This edition took about two months to produce and I’m very pleased with it.

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Are we right in thinking there’s a special gold edition of Flabbergast too? Where can folks buy the two editions?

Yes, I produced a smaller edition with an additional layer of gold. Both are available in my online shop.

And finally, what’s on the horizon for you in the coming months?

In the aftermath of the pandemic things still feel quite uncertain so I’m trying to focus on the important things: catching up with friends and family and working on personal projects.

by Felicity Jackson (she/her)

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