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Letters

Letters

A folk fanatic born and raised in Sheffield, Louis Romégoux may have moved on to pastures new but we'll continue to chant 'Yorkshire' with pride as we count his brand new EP, Letters, as another local triumph. Drawing influences from both sides of his Franco-British dual heritage, Letters is a fine example of folk done well. The 6-track is an eclectic mix within its genre, showcasing everything from the upbeat and lively to the more traditional and familiar.

A good example of this is the title track, in which we are treated to a dynamic fusion of cultural influences, seemingly the essence of Romégoux's music. The contemporary feel of the song comes from the funky, soulful rhythm which, when paired with a playful melody, creates a Latin vibe that begs to be danced to. The second verse in French gives the song a more personal touch, whilst unavoidably evoking the sort of passion and sexuality which can only be created by the language of love. 'Lizard King' continues with the sensuality as Romégoux sings of "one night in Paris". Although much more traditional in its folk sound, this song still captures the same European heart, setting it aside from other similar UK-born folk artists.

'Love and Wine' and 'Miss Shadenfreude' reminded me of much of the popular folk of this century, particularly The Tallest Man on Earth and Johnny Flynn. Cutesy high-pitch, up-tempo guitar riffs paired with love ballad lyrics; the songs are current, catchy and very likeable. Tying the record up in a neat bow, Romégoux throws in a couple of pseudo-folk tracks for the traditionalists amongst us. The old and new are married in perfect quantities to create something that is both original and approachable.

This EP is a great little teaser of what is yet to come from Romégoux. I predict a full-length album will be on the cards soon enough. Although currently residing in Austria, Romégoux is set to announce his UK tour for this spring soon, so keep an eye on his website. I'm sure he will be swinging by his hometown in the not-too-distant future.