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Exhibition by queer artists 'amplifies important LGBTQIA+ narratives'

Named after a line from Derek Jarman, Beneath the Pewter Sky at Sheffield's GLOAM gallery aims to "transport the viewer to another place".

Gusty Ferro image 1

Work by Gusty Ferro.

GLOAM.

A new exhibition at Sheffield's GLOAM gallery is showcasing work by artists from across the UK who identify as LGBTQIA+.

'Beneath the Pewter Sky' is open to the public at the Arundel Street space on Saturday 8 and 15 October, featuring a mix of sculpture, video, textiles and digital media.

Named after a quote from queer artist Derek Jarman's book Modern Nature, the show includes work from Dan Chan, Charlotte Cullen, Gusty Ferro and India Garry.

"All of the artists in the show create works that I really admire and have done for some time," curator and GLOAM co-director Thomas Griffiths told Now Then.

"As I've been involved in queer shows in the past, I wanted to be able to give back and do the same, strengthening discussion and representation."

According to the exhibition programme, the pieces on show "transport the viewer to another place through themes of fantasy, sci-fi and blurred realities."

Other artists displaying work include Will Hughes, Kumbirai Makumbe, David Reynolds, Connor Shields and Danielle Williams.

GLOAM is an exhibition and studio space located on the site of the former Lughole music venue. It was set up by Mark Riddington in 2017 and is now run as an artists' co-operative.

When curating the show, Griffiths said he wanted to "create a dialogue around the LGBTQIA+ community, due to the lack of representation and positive information in the news."

"I wanted to create an exhibition that gives insight and helps provide understanding through the scope of artists involved – to amplify the important narratives that feed through the work."

Learn more

Beneath the Pewter Sky is open 8 and 15 October, 12-4pm.

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